Statement on Michigan Medicine economic recovery plan

Author | Mary Masson

As announced on May 5, 2020, COVID-19 efforts at Michigan Medicine resulted in significant operating losses that resulted in an extensive expense reduction initiative. Part of that included eliminating 1,400 positions.  However, Michigan Medicine achieved more than half of that target through attrition and furloughs.  As a result, Michigan Medicine’s reduction in force will impact approximately 738 employees. 

Depending on tenure, those impacted will receive pay and benefits for varying periods of time and all will have access to career transition assistance.

Michigan Medicine made safety in all our missions the top priority when determining where reductions in force would occur. These challenging but carefully considered actions will help Michigan Medicine continue to provide hope and healing to our patients and allow us to continue to support our clinical, educational and research missions.

Media Contact Public Relations

Department of Communication at Michigan Medicine

[email protected]

734-764-2220

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