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Celebrate an incredible patient success story. Explore a clinical breakthrough. Discover news that shapes the future of health care.

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Health Lab

Michigan Medicine's daily online publication featuring news and stories about the future of healthcare. 

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At Michigan Medicine, we believe there’s a difference between an answer and a Michigan Answer.

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The latest from our media team, plus resources for members of the press.

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NOTICE: Except where otherwise noted, all articles are published under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license. You are free to copy, distribute, adapt, transmit, or make commercial use of this work as long as you attribute Michigan Medicine as the original creator and include a link to this article.

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Health Lab
Real-time opioid overdose data improves safety response from community
To improve coordinated community response to opioid overdoses, University of Michigan researchers are placing near-real time data in the hands of public health and safety officers. The Michigan System for Opioid Overdose Surveillance, was created in 2016 in response to the opioid crisis through a partnership between the University of Michigan Injury Prevention Center and the Michigan High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas.
smart watch on wrist
Health Lab
Clinical smart watch finds success at identifying atrial fibrillation
A Michigan Medicine research team developed a prescription wristwatch that continuously monitors the wearer’s heart rhythm and uses a unique algorithm to detect atrial fibrillation. The clinical-grade device, called the Verily Study Watch, proved very accurate at identifying atrial fibrillation in participants.
sketched out bacteria in a dish yellow and blue colors of U-M
Health Lab
This gross mixture has big benefits for the study of bacteria
Michigan Medicine researchers have found that growing bacteria on agar mixed with organs is an efficient and effective way to study infectious pathogens.
three pharmacists smiling
Health Lab
An innovative pharmacy service for pain management
An innovative service at Michigan Medicine offers pain management support for patients and care teams
patient giving paperwork and person saying no with hand graphic moving teal white grey navy orange
Health Lab
Why new patient paperwork isn’t just busy work
While it’s easy to overlook doctor's office questionnaires, that paperwork actually serves a vital role in better understanding how to treat you. Called patient reported outcomes, this information gives medical specialists insight into how treatments truly impact you as a patient.
family smiling togehter
Health Lab
Ketogenic diet helps 4-year-old live seizure free
Last year, a young girl experienced up to 40 seizures a week. Today, after nearly a year of working with the ketogenic diet team at University of Michigan Health C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital – overseen by a pediatric neurologist and dietitian – she’s celebrating six months of seizure freedom.
From the Press Room See all News Releases See the Big House: Save a Life, picture of Michigan Stadium for the Be a Hero blood drive event on Sunday, November 19, 8 a.m. until 5 p.m.
News Release
'Be a Hero' and donate blood during this year’s 'Blood Battle'
'Be a Hero' and donate blood during this year’s 'Blood Battle'
Michigan Medicine neuroscientist Huda Akil, Ph.D., accepts National Medal of Science from President Joe Biden.
News Release
U-M neuroscientist Huda Akil, Ph.D., wins National Medal of Science
Distinguished U-M neuroscientist Huda Akil, Ph.D., has received the nation’s highest scientific honor – the National Medal of Science -- for her contributions to science and their impact on humankind’s understanding of depression, anxiety, addiction and more.
News Release
Michigan Medicine and Henry Ford Health to conduct clinical trial on effect of CBD on post-surgical opioid use
Michigan Medicine and Henry Ford Health soon will launch a multisite clinical trial to assess if administering cannabidiol (CBD) before and after surgery may reduce the need for opioids following a total knee arthroplasty. The $6 million, 5-year grant was awarded by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) within the National Institutes of Health.
Tony Denton, headshot smiling
News Release
Senior vice president and chief environmental, social and governance officer, Tony Denton, J.D., M.H.A., named ‘Diversity Leader to Watch’ by Modern Healthcare
Senior vice president and chief environmental, social and governance officer, Tony Denton, J.D., M.H.A., named ‘Diversity Leader to Watch’ by Modern Healthcare
HistoSonics Edison platform
News Release
U-M Health to purchase Edison platform for histotripsy, following FDA approval
Technology developed at U-M uses sound waves to destroy tissue, providing a new type of cancer therapy
Carter in white coat, inducted to NAM
News Release
Firearm injury prevention expert and emergency medicine physician Patrick M. Carter, M.D., elected to National Academy of Medicine
This morning, Patrick M. Carter, M.D., was elected to the National Academy of Medicine, or the NAM, which is one of the highest honors in the fields of health and medicine and recognizes individuals who have demonstrated outstanding professional achievement and commitment to service.
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Michigan Answers
They found their Michigan Answer. So can you.

With the full power of all three divisions of our academic medical center working to find the answers you need when it matters most, the possibilities are limitless.

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Bentley's Michigan Answer
Bentley's Michigan Answer

As Marguerita Booth had never heard of a child being born with their organs on the outside of their body. And yet as she lay in the darkened room of her first ultrasound of her first pregnancy, she was suddenly introduced to a condition that surprisingly affects 1 in every 3600 babies.

Learn more about Bentley
Man shaving in front of mirror with white and blue striped shower curtain in the background
Kade's Michigan Answer
Kade's Michigan Answer

Alone. Scared. Never knowing who to trust or where to turn for help. That’s how Kade Fitzgerald of Jackson, Michigan lived the first 32 years of his life. Assigned female at birth, Kade knew at age 6 that he was meant to be a man.

Read Kade's story
Black woman holding two sleeping babies wearing pink patterned sleepers and with nasal tubes facing each other
Merriah and Melliah's Michigan Answer
Merriah and Melliah's Michigan Answer

Few moments eclipse the joy of discovering that you’re pregnant with twins. But for 37-year-old Merrick and 37-year-old Mychal, the news that they’d be having fraternal girls with an expected delivery date of Christmas Day 2020 made the news even more exciting.

Read Merriah and Melliah's story
Little boy in green shirt and blue pants holding a blue toy airplane
Carter's Michigan Answer
Carter's Michigan Answer

Carter Hilton celebrated his sixth birthday by doing what he loves most: running around his backyard, dancing with his younger brother, and being chased throughout the house by his mom. It helps that Carter is a naturally exuberant child. It also helps that Michigan Medicine performed the first in-womb spina bifida surgery in Michigan nearly four months before Carter was born.

Read Carter's story
Black woman in white coat and wearing blue surgical gloves holding scientific instrument in a lab
Sierra's Michigan Answer
Sierra's Michigan Answer

Imagine two patients. Both the same age and height. The same gender and race. Both have a similar medical history. Two people, almost identical in every way. So, why does one of them, seemingly at random, develop diabetes?

Read Sierra's story
Female doctor wearing scrubs and glasses with large surgical lights behind her
Dr. Valbuena's Michigan Answer
Dr. Valbuena's Michigan Answer

Most aspiring physicians study medicine with the hopes of saving lives, being on the cutting edge of research, or developing the latest therapies and technologies. For Dr. Valeria Valbuena, it was all of the above, plus one additional life-affirming goal.

Read Dr. Valbuena's story
Man gesturing at glass board filled with numbers with a young man standing in the background
Dr. Vydiswaran's Michigan Answer
Dr. Vydiswaran's Michigan Answer

What if the true power of social media isn’t found in a like, tweet or follow? For an emerging field of research taking place at Michigan Medicine, it’s the data inside social media that may have the power to give patients bigger answers and better outcomes.

Read Dr. Vydiswaran's story
Male doctor holding tiny pacemaker in his hand
Dr. Cunnane's Michigan Answer
Dr. Cunnane's Michigan Answer

Since 1958, millions of lives have been saved by what could arguably be considered as medicine’s biggest breakthrough – the pacemaker. And while its technology has dramatically improved over the last 63 years, chief concerns regarding the pacemaker have always been that it was too big and bulky and that the wires leading from it would sometimes break. But in February of 2020, Michigan Medicine helped change all of that.

Read Dr. Cunnane's Michigan Answer
From across Michigan Medicine See all News & Stories maps purple and blue
Health Lab
Real-time opioid overdose data improves safety response from community
To improve coordinated community response to opioid overdoses, University of Michigan researchers are placing near-real time data in the hands of public health and safety officers. The Michigan System for Opioid Overdose Surveillance, was created in 2016 in response to the opioid crisis through a partnership between the University of Michigan Injury Prevention Center and the Michigan High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas.
smart watch on wrist
Health Lab
Clinical smart watch finds success at identifying atrial fibrillation
A Michigan Medicine research team developed a prescription wristwatch that continuously monitors the wearer’s heart rhythm and uses a unique algorithm to detect atrial fibrillation. The clinical-grade device, called the Verily Study Watch, proved very accurate at identifying atrial fibrillation in participants.
sketched out bacteria in a dish yellow and blue colors of U-M
Health Lab
This gross mixture has big benefits for the study of bacteria
Michigan Medicine researchers have found that growing bacteria on agar mixed with organs is an efficient and effective way to study infectious pathogens.
patient giving paperwork and person saying no with hand graphic moving teal white grey navy orange
Health Lab
Why new patient paperwork isn’t just busy work
While it’s easy to overlook doctor's office questionnaires, that paperwork actually serves a vital role in better understanding how to treat you. Called patient reported outcomes, this information gives medical specialists insight into how treatments truly impact you as a patient.
three pharmacists smiling
Health Lab
An innovative pharmacy service for pain management
An innovative service at Michigan Medicine offers pain management support for patients and care teams
green blue map of michigan
Health Lab
How does exposure to ‘forever chemicals’ impact your cancer risk
Pearce, professor of epidemiology at the School of Public Health and co-lead of Rogel’s cancer control and population sciences program, reflects on the project and why bringing this study to Michigan is so critical.