United in Excellence

We are Michigan Medicine, the University of Michigan’s academic medical center, where we work tirelessly to transform lives through a combination of ground-breaking research, expert clinical care and leading-edge medical and scientific education.

About Us
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WE BRING TOGETHER THE BRIGHTEST MINDS to

Here, as an integral part of the world-renowned University of Michigan, Michigan Medicine's brightest minds collaborate in a diverse environment to make bold advances in medical education, research and patient care to transform lives for the better.

Transform Lives
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About Us
One Mission. One Michigan Medicine.

As one of the nation's top academic medical centers, we bring together world-class experts from research, patient care and education to make groundbreaking discoveries that create life-changing medicine.

Our Mission
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Our Community

Our commitment to support and enrich the lives of everyone we touch extends beyond the walls of our hospitals and clinics to our local neighborhoods and community.

Find out about our services and outreach
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Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

We are committed to cultivating an inclusive health environment where all members of the Michigan Medicine community are empowered, included, needed and known.

Learn about DEI at Michigan Medicine
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Our Mission and Vision

Over 150 years of teaching, research, and patient care continue to inspire an endless curiosity and passion for transforming lives.

Learn more about our mission and vision
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Giving

Your donation fuels the future of health care, as today's innovative research, clinical trials and medical education lead to tomorrow's life-saving treatments.

Make a difference through giving
From Our CEO
Leading Through Innovation and Discovery

We have tremendous potential here at Michigan to lead the future of healthcare through innovation and discovery.

Dean, U-M Medical School; Executive Vice President, Medical Affairs, University of Michigan; Chief Executive Officer, Michigan Medicine
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Careers
Accelerate Your Career. Advance World Health.

Being part of something greater, of serving a larger mission of discovery and care — that's the heart of what drives people to work at Michigan.

Careers at Michigan Medicine
Michigan Answers
They found their Michigan Answer. So can you.

With the full power of all three divisions of our academic medical center working to find the answers you need when it matters most, the possibilities are limitless.

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Bentley's Michigan Answer
Bentley's Michigan Answer

As Marguerita Booth had never heard of a child being born with their organs on the outside of their body. And yet as she lay in the darkened room of her first ultrasound of her first pregnancy, she was suddenly introduced to a condition that surprisingly affects 1 in every 3600 babies.

Learn more about Bentley
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Kade's Michigan Answer
Kade's Michigan Answer

Alone. Scared. Never knowing who to trust or where to turn for help. That’s how Kade Fitzgerald of Jackson, Michigan lived the first 32 years of his life. Assigned female at birth, Kade knew at age 6 that he was meant to be a man.

Read Kade's story
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Merriah and Melliah's Michigan Answer
Merriah and Melliah's Michigan Answer

Few moments eclipse the joy of discovering that you’re pregnant with twins. But for 37-year-old Merrick and 37-year-old Mychal, the news that they’d be having fraternal girls with an expected delivery date of Christmas Day 2020 made the news even more exciting.

Read Merriah and Melliah's story
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Carter's Michigan Answer
Carter's Michigan Answer

Carter Hilton celebrated his sixth birthday by doing what he loves most: running around his backyard, dancing with his younger brother, and being chased throughout the house by his mom. It helps that Carter is a naturally exuberant child. It also helps that Michigan Medicine performed the first in-womb spina bifida surgery in Michigan nearly four months before Carter was born.

Read Carter's story
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Sierra's Michigan Answer
Sierra's Michigan Answer

Imagine two patients. Both the same age and height. The same gender and race. Both have a similar medical history. Two people, almost identical in every way. So, why does one of them, seemingly at random, develop diabetes?

Read Sierra's story
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Dr. Valbuena's Michigan Answer
Dr. Valbuena's Michigan Answer

Most aspiring physicians study medicine with the hopes of saving lives, being on the cutting edge of research, or developing the latest therapies and technologies. For Dr. Valeria Valbuena, it was all of the above, plus one additional life-affirming goal.

Read Dr. Valbuena's story
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Dr. Vydiswaran's Michigan Answer
Dr. Vydiswaran's Michigan Answer

What if the true power of social media isn’t found in a like, tweet or follow? For an emerging field of research taking place at Michigan Medicine, it’s the data inside social media that may have the power to give patients bigger answers and better outcomes.

Read Dr. Vydiswaran's story
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Dr. Cunnane's Michigan Answer
Dr. Cunnane's Michigan Answer

Since 1958, millions of lives have been saved by what could arguably be considered as medicine’s biggest breakthrough – the pacemaker. And while its technology has dramatically improved over the last 63 years, chief concerns regarding the pacemaker have always been that it was too big and bulky and that the wires leading from it would sometimes break. But in February of 2020, Michigan Medicine helped change all of that.

Read Dr. Cunnane's Michigan Answer
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Health Lab
Physical activity improves early with customized text messages in patients with heart problems
A study found personalized text messages effectively promoted increased physical activity for patients after significant heart events — such as a heart attack or surgery — but those effects later diminished.
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Health Lab
Bipolar disorder and alcohol: It’s not as simple as 'self-medication'
People with bipolar disorder have a high risk of alcohol use issues, which have been seen as “self medication,” but a study shows that changes in drinking predict worse symptoms.
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Health Lab
Blood pressure high for years? Beware of stroke risk
A study led by Michigan Medicine narrows in on the cumulative effects of years of high systolic blood pressure — the top number on the blood pressure reading and how hard the heart pumps blood to the arteries — finding that a higher average reading during adulthood is linked with a greater risk for the two most common types of stroke.
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News Release
Michigan Medicine notifies patients of health information breach
Michigan Medicine is notifying approximately 56,953 individuals about employee email accounts that were compromised, potentially exposing some patient health information.
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News Release
U-M has 14 top 10 medical education programs in latest Doximity Residency Navigator
The 2024-25 Doximity Residency Navigator has been released. It shows that U-M has six top 5 medical education programs, with nine more in the top 10 and another nine in the top 25.
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Health Lab
Drug-chemo combo increases cancer treatment efficacy
A study finds giving a fatty acid inhibitor alongside chemotherapy could improve the treatment efficacy for patients with brain metastases from triple negative breast cancer