Medical School, School of Nursing strong in 2021 Best Graduate School rankings

Author | Jina Sawani

Michigan Medicine continues to excel in training the next generation of health care leaders, as reflected in the 2021 U.S. News and World Report Best Graduate School rankings, released today (March 17).

The University of Michigan Medical School, School of Nursing and Department of Biomedical Engineering are rated among the best nationally for their various educational programs. 

Our medical school is the No. 5 institution for primary care training, and we rank No. 15 nationally among research medical schools. Both rankings are up one spot from last year.

U.S. News and World Report also ranked eight specialties, and U-M achieved a top-15 ranking in all eight: Surgery (5), Anesthesiology, Family Medicine and Internal Medicine (all at 6), Radiology (8), Obstetrics and Gynecology (10), Pediatrics (12) and Psychiatry (14). We are one of only three primary care schools to achieve a ranking in all eight categories, and one of only six in research to do so.

The school’s reputation among residency directors continues to be strong, as the U-M registered a second-place tie among primary care schools (score of 4.2 out of 5), and tied for the third-highest assessment score for research institutions (4.4/5).

The School of Nursing nurse-midwifery program is No. 2 nationally. Its master’s degree program is ninth nationally, with top-10 nurse practitioner rankings in pediatric primary care (6) and family (9). Nursing’s Doctor of Nursing Practice program is No. 13, with top-10 nurse practitioner rankings in adult gerontology primary care (6) and family (7).

The U-M, which operates its Department of Biomedical Engineering as a joint venture between the Medical School and College of Engineering, is No. 9 nationally in biomedical engineering/bioengineering. 

Following is a summary of the 2021 rankings:

Medical Schools Overall

Primary Care: 5

Research: 15 (tie)

Medical School Specialties

Surgery: 5

Anesthesiology: 6 (tie)

Family Medicine: 6

Internal Medicine: 6

Radiology: 8

Obstetrics and Gynecology: 10 (tie)

Pediatrics: 12 (tie)

Psychiatry: 14

School of Nursing

Nurse-Midwifery Program: 2 (tie)

Master’s Degree Program: 9 (tie)

Pediatric Primary Care Nurse Practitioner (master’s): 6

Family Nurse Practitioner (master’s):  9 (tie)

Doctor of Nursing Practice Program: 13

Adult Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner (doctorate): 6 (tie)

Family Nurse Practitioner (doctorate): 7 (tie)

Medical School/College of Engineering

Biomedical Engineering/Bioengineering: 9 (tie)

For a complete list of 2021 rankings from U.S. News and World Report, click here

Media Contact Public Relations

Department of Communication at Michigan Medicine

[email protected]

734-764-2220

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