‘We’ve Got to Do More to Help Children Survive These Devastating Cancers’

Just four percent of federal cancer research dollars go to pediatrics. But more research is needed to change the outcome for many childhood cancers.

1:00 PM

Author | Michigan Medicine


"We've got to do more to help children survive these devastating cancers," says Valerie Opipari, M.D., a pediatric oncologist and chair of the Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases at C.S. Mott Children's Hospital. "Investment in childhood cancer research is a good investment; it's desperately important for us to advance medicine that will cure childhood cancers."

Watch the video above for more on why pediatric cancer research is so vital. See how the University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children's Hospital community is making a difference and how you can help.

This post is part of a series of articles on breakthrough pediatric cancer research during Childhood Cancer Awareness Month. Learn more about how you can play a role in the fight to Block Out Cancer.


More Articles About: Cancer Care Pediatric Cancer CS Mott Children's Hospital Children's Health
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