Children commonly face new, worsening health problems months after critical illness from sepsis

1 in 5 children in national study cohort developed new or progressive medical conditions within six months of leaving the ICU for sepsis care.

11:00 AM

Author | Beata Mostafavi

hospital bed

Even months after critical illness for sepsis, children are at risk for new or worsening medical conditions, a study suggests.

One in five children in a national cohort either developed or experienced progressing disease within six months of leaving the intensive care unit for sepsis, according to the research in JAMA Pediatrics.

Researchers compared data from 5,150 children who received ICU care for sepsis to 96,361 who experienced critical illness from other conditions. Those with sepsis were more likely to later experience chronic respiratory failure, problems requiring nutritional dependence and chronic kidney disease. Children in both groups were also at risk of developing a seizure disorder.

"Children who survive severe sepsis are at risk of long-term health consequences that impact their quality of life and future health needs," said lead author Erin Carlton, M.D., MSc., a pediatric intensivist at University of Michigan Health C.S. Mott Children's Hospital.

Not all children who recover from critical illness from sepsis are impacted equally, the study suggests. Those with pre-existing illnesses were three times more likely to experience new or worsening disease.

Meanwhile, younger children – particularly those under age one – were twice as likely to require supplemental nutrition, such as needing a feeding tube, or develop a new seizure condition such as epilepsy, than older children.

Every year, 70,000 children in the U.S. are hospitalized with sepsis, a life-threatening condition that occurs when a body's response to infection goes into overdrive, causing damage to vital organs. It is a leading cause of death among children and newborns.

"Many children who require critical care for sepsis have debilitating physical, cognitive or emotional challenges long after recovery," Carlton said. "Our findings suggest a need for improved follow up care focused on identifying and treating new or worsening medical conditions."

Additional authors include Nancy McNamara, M.D.; Ryan Barbaro, M.D., M.Sc.; Lisa Prosser, Ph.D. and Hallie Prescott, M.D., M.Sc., all of U-M, as well as Acham Gebremariam, M.S.; Aline Maddux, M.D., M.S.C.S.; Timothy Cornell, M.D.; Theodore Iwashyna, M.D., Ph.D.; Jerry Zimmerman, M.D., Ph.D. and Scott Weiss, M.D., M.S.C.E. 

Study cited: "New and progressive medical conditions after pediatric sepsis hospitalization requiring critical care," JAMA Pediatrics. DOI: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2022.3554


More Articles About: Lab Notes CS Mott Children's Hospital Pediatric Health Conditions Sepsis Emergency & Trauma Care Hospitals & Centers
Health Lab word mark overlaying blue cells
Health Lab

Explore a variety of health care news & stories by visiting the Health Lab home page for more articles.

Media Contact Public Relations

Department of Communication at Michigan Medicine

[email protected]

734-764-2220

Stay Informed

Want top health & research news weekly? Sign up for Health Lab’s newsletters today!

Subscribe
Featured News & Stories hospital bed
Health Lab
Understanding genes involved with weakened immunity during sepsis in kids
Pilot study identifies genes potentially associated with the development of a weakened immune system and poor sepsis outcomes in children.
mom smiling with 3 kids
Health Lab
Adolescents with heart disease learn resilience skills, connect with peers through unique program
Youth with heart disease enrolled in unique program that teaches resilience and builds connections with their peers
Health Lab Podcast in brackets with a background with a dark blue translucent layers over cells
Health Lab Podcast
Presenting: The Fundamentals
Today on Health Lab, we are sharing an episode of The Fundamentals, another podcast from the Michigan Medicine Podcast Network that just launched its second season earlier this month. On this episode of The Fundamentals: "Cannabis and psychedelics: stigmatized substances or powerful therapeutics?" Dr. Kevin Boehnke talks about cannabis, psychedelics, and the increasing body of evidence for their legitimization as therapeutics.
provider sitting writing something down with person in khakis and blue shirt unbuttoned with white shirt under
Health Lab
ER screening tool helps identify youth at risk of experiencing firearm violence
A study published by researchers at the University of Michigan reveals that implementing this screening tool can help identify and support youth with firearm violence history.
Health Lab
Mother-son heart bond: Woman relives congenital heart journey through newborn
A mother relives congenital heart journey through newborn.
10 year old boy leaning against tree and posing with his mom and sisters outside
Health Lab
Family travels over 1,000 miles for son’s heart transplant
Family travels over 1,000 miles for son's heart transplant and ongoing heart care