University of Michigan Health named a 2022 Leapfrog Top Teaching Hospital

Author | Jina Sawani

ANN ARBOR - The Leapfrog Group has named University of Michigan Health one of its 2022 Top Teaching Hospitals. Each year, the organization recognizes hospitals that have achieved “true excellence” and honor them with being named one of their top hospitals. In order to achieve this distinction, hospitals must meet the nation’s toughest standards for safety and quality. 

“University of Michigan Health being named a Leapfrog Top Teaching Hospital again this year isn’t surprising, but it certainly is noteworthy,” said Debra Weinstein, M.D., who serves as the executive vice dean for academic affairs at the University of Michigan Medical School and chief academic officer for Michigan Medicine. “Maintaining the highest standards of patient safety isn’t just critical to the care we deliver today, it’s also essential to the quality of education we provide.”

The Leapfrog Group is an independent national watchdog organization with a 10-year history of assigning letter grades to general hospitals throughout the United States, based on a hospital’s ability to prevent medical errors and harm to patients. The grading system is peer-reviewed, fully transparent, and free to the public. Hospital Safety Grade results are based on more than 30 national performance measures and are updated each fall and spring.

“Our clinical environment influences the approaches to care that our students, residents and fellows develop,” said Weinstein. “Safety-focused practices learned at Michigan Medicine will inevitably benefit the patients they will treat throughout their careers. And we’re very proud of that.”

To see University of Michigan’s full grade details and to access patient tips for staying safe in the hospital, visit HospitalSafetyGrade.org and follow The Leapfrog Group on Twitter, Facebook, and via its newsletter. 

About Michigan Medicine: At Michigan Medicine, we advance health to serve Michigan and the world. We pursue excellence every day in our five hospitals, 125 clinics and home care operations that handle more than 2.3 million outpatient visits a year, as well as educate the next generation of physicians, health professionals and scientists in our U-M Medical School.

Michigan Medicine includes the top ranked U-M Medical School and University of Michigan Health, which includes the C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital, Von Voigtlander Women’s Hospital, University Hospital, the Frankel Cardiovascular Center, Metro Health and the Rogel Cancer Center. The U-M Medical School is one of the nation's biomedical research powerhouses, with total research funding of more than $500 million.

More information is available at www.michiganmedicine.org.

About The Leapfrog Group: Founded in 2000 by large employers and other purchasers, The Leapfrog Group is a national nonprofit organization driving a movement for giant leaps for patient safety. The flagship Leapfrog Hospital Survey and new Leapfrog Ambulatory Surgery Center (ASC) Survey collect and transparently report hospital and ASC performance, empowering purchasers to find the highest-value care and giving consumers the lifesaving information they need to make informed decisions. The Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade, Leapfrog's other main initiative, assigns letter grades to hospitals based on their record of patient safety, helping consumers protect themselves and their families from errors, injuries, accidents and infections. 

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