Michigan Medicine hospitals ranked No. 5 in the nation by U.S. News & World Report

Adult hospital ranked No. 1 overall Best Hospital in Michigan; ranked in the national top 10 for 10 medical and surgical specialties

Author | Mary Masson

Michigan Medicine’s adult hospitals were ranked No. 5 in the nation by U.S. News & World Report “Best Hospitals” rankings for 2018-19, an honor that measures excellence in patient care.

Michigan Medicine, the academic medical center of the University of Michigan, also had 10 surgical and medical specialties ranked in the nation’s top 10. The annual rankings placed Michigan Medicine No. 1 in Michigan.

“This No. 5 ranking is a reflection of our relentless commitment to putting patients first,” said Marschall Runge, M.D., Ph.D., who is executive vice president for medical affairs at the University of Michigan, chief executive officer of Michigan Medicine and dean of the U-M Medical School.

 “These rankings are heavily influenced by quality and safety measures. I am proud of the people in this organization who go above and beyond every day to ensure our high standards of quality and safety,” said Runge.

The U.S. News & World Report Honor Roll rankings are achieved in part by our excellent nurse to patient ratios. Our ratios are in the top 2 percent of all hospitals in the country.

 “Our employees – from our multi-disciplinary care teams, to our nurses, to our support staff — embody our values of teamwork, integrity, innovation and excellence, and they earn this national recognition every day,” said Runge.

Only 3 percent, or 152 hospitals out of the more than 4,500 evaluated by U.S. News & World Report, earned even one ranked spot.

Michigan Medicine prioritizes improving outcomes and patient care, which influenced the No. 5 ranking, the highest ranking ever for Michigan Medicine, said David Spahlinger, M.D., president of the University of Michigan Health System and executive vice dean for clinical affairs of the U-M Medical School.

“The national No. 5 ranking, along with 10 of our specialties ranked in the national top 10, and being ranked No. 1 in Michigan ¬— all are reflections of the expertise and dedication of our staff, our learners and our faculty,” said Spahlinger.

“Every day, we strive to provide a great patient experience with innovative, cutting-edge treatments. These rankings validate our efforts, and we are proud of the people who are so committed to our patients and families.”

Ten U-M specialty areas rank in the top 10 in the country: Otolaryngology (Ear, Nose and Throat) (#1),  Gynecology (#2), Pulmonology (#5, 2-way tie), Urology (#5), Gastroenterology and GI surgery (#6), Geriatrics (#7), Nephrology (#8), Cardiology and heart surgery (#8, 2-way tie), Ophthalmology (#8) and Neurology and Neurosurgery (#9).

Also receiving impressive rankings: Rheumatology (#11), Cancer (#15, 2-way tie), Diabetes and Endocrinology (#13), Orthopedics (#21) and Rehabilitation was cited as high performing.

“A No. 5 national ranking is clearly an honor,” said Jeffrey Desmond, M.D., chief medical officer of Michigan Medicine.

“It is proof that our team approach with physicians, nurses and all care providers gets outstanding results. This teamwork is an important core value that we will continue to make a priority.”

Our talented nurses play a significant role in the areas of care ranked by U.S. News & World Report, said Ann Scanlon McGinity, Ph.D, R.N., F.A.A.N., chief nurse executive for Michigan Medicine.

“Our institution values its entire nursing community, which is made up of more than 5,000 high-caliber women and men who are dedicated to delivering the best patient experience. We know the care our nurses provide is an essential component in achieving this year’s No. 5 ranking,” said Scanlon McGinity.

 “We thank them for the amazing work they do in providing safe and high-quality care to our patients and families.”

The U.S. News & World Report “Best Hospitals” methodologies in most areas of care are based largely, or entirely, on objective measures such as risk-adjusted survival and readmission rates, volume, patient experience, patient safety and quality of nursing, among other care-related indicators.

Two months ago U-M’s Michigan Medicine also received recognition by USNWR for its pediatric hospital – C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital. Mott was ranked No. 1 in Michigan and was the only hospital in the state ranked in all 10 pediatric specialties.

To learn more about other U-M clinical care honors, visit https://www.uofmhealth.org/about-umhs/honors-awards.

For detailed data about the safety and quality of care at U-M, far beyond what is available from rating agencies, visit www.uofmhealth.org and www.michiganmedicine.org.
About Michigan Medicine: At Michigan Medicine, we create the future of healthcare through the discovery of new knowledge for the benefit of patients and society; educate the next generation of physicians, health professionals and scientists; and serve the health needs of our citizens. We pursue excellence every day in our three hospitals, 125 clinics and home care operations that handle more than 2.3 million outpatient visits a year.

Michigan Medicine includes the top ranked U-M Medical School and the University of Michigan Health System, which includes the C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital, Von Voigtlander Women’s Hospital, University Hospital, the Frankel Cardiovascular Center and the Rogel Cancer Center. The U-M Medical School is one of the nation's biomedical research powerhouses, with total research funding of more than $470 million.

Media Contact Public Relations

Department of Communication at Michigan Medicine

MichMedmedia@med.umich.edu

734-764-2220

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